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Front brake service
#1
I have done some search and I read how to remove wheel and disc. I have torx bit and breaker bar and torque wrench.
Do you know the dimension of the torx bolts? Im thinking just to change them for a hex bolt or even an allen key bolt.
Also, in the caliper, is there any seal what I need to change? I would clean out the calipers and give them a new fluid too.
I have to do annually on my bike so I am not scared Smile
Do someone know an online part fiche webpage?
I would ask about the brands of the discs. I dont want to buy cheap, I have seen EBC for 60 a pair, I think that is reasonable. Is it worth the extra money or any 30-40 quid discs do the same mileage?
I think it is depends on the brake pads too. In my bike I use original Honda ones and they are kind for the discs and I have good stopping power. Is here the same or just buy any aftermarket pads?
I have ordered a Haynes manual, I just havent got it Smile
Thanks in advance
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#2
I would leave the calipers alone unless they are giving trouble. They are reliable enough. What torx do you mean? The one that holds the disc to the hub?
If so, you may find it sits proud and fouls the wheel.

What Honda have you got??
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#3
I have a Honda VFR 750 good old V4 Smile
I think the 2 torx at the caliper. I havent got the haynes or the car, Im just thinking and planning ahead Smile
[Image: 5020e1f9083adad8b8425af52fb0d53c.jpg]
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#4
If you can work on your Honda you can work on your Citroen lol
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#5
I would be wary of changing the caliper bolts as they will be made of a high tensile steel. Changing them for a lower spec bolt would not be advisable and I suspect you would run the risk of the bolts shearing under the stress of braking ||
[+] 2 users say Thank You to DaveH for this post
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#6
13 mm hex socket for caliper pin bolts.
   

Torx T55 for caliper frame bolts.
   
   

Torx T30 for brake disk-to-hub.
   

You don't need to change any seal in the caliper. Just check that they are free of cracks.
Then remove the caliper pins, clean and lubricate them using high temperature silicone grease.
   
[+] 1 user says Thank You to Buki for this post
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#7
(30-03-2016, 09:41 PM)Buki Wrote:  13 mm hex socket for caliper pin bolts.


Torx T55 for caliper frame bolts.



Torx T30 for brake disk-to-hub.


You don't need to change any seal in the caliper. Just check that they are free of cracks.
Then remove the caliper pins, clean and lubricate them using high temperature silicone grease.
Cheers mate, very helpful.
I dont like the silicone grease around rubber things, they are tend to swell. I use red rubber grease, safe around rubber Smile
But the another tips spot on Smile
So the caliper works the same as on my bike just bigger size Smile
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#8
Clamp your flexible pipe and undo the bleed nipple when you push the piston back. You will lose a little fluid but it saves bleeding and can damage the master cylinder seals if you force fluid back into it. The two small screws in the disc don't need to be tight they only stop it slipping when the wheel studs are out so the holes line up. Knock the torx into the carrier bolt heads well as it is only shallow and once they are burred they will need drastic measures to get them out. Silicone grease is safe on rubber, mineral grease can cause deterioration but red rubber grease is what I use as well. I have a pot which will probably last forever. Big Grin I got Ferodo pads and EBC discs for £54 when I did mine a while ago, £60 sounds a lot just for discs.
So where does this bit go then ?
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#9
Just to add that those large Torx bolts have threadlock and are very tight. Burr the torx at your peril! It's a shame they need to be removed to get the disc off, a bit of a design mistake in my opinion.
MkIII VTR 1.6hdi Modutop, Climate Pack, 16" Alloys
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#10
(31-03-2016, 08:36 AM)ffrenchie Wrote:  Clamp your flexible pipe and undo the bleed nipple when you push the piston back. You will lose a little fluid but it saves bleeding and can damage the master cylinder seals if you force fluid back into it. The two small screws in the disc don't need to be tight they only stop it slipping when the wheel studs are out so the holes line up. Knock the torx into the carrier bolt heads well as it is only shallow and once they are burred they will need drastic measures to get them out. Silicone grease is safe on rubber, mineral grease can cause deterioration but red rubber grease is what I use as well. I have a pot which will probably last forever. Big Grin I got Ferodo pads and EBC discs for £54 when I did mine a while ago, £60 sounds a lot just for discs.
Cheers, good advice, but im gonna change the fluid too because its brown and not golden colour. So Im gonna do the bleeding Smile
If I shear the torx I have a screw extractor set Big Grin
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