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EOLYS
#1
Hello all.

During my trip back from holidays, a triangle warning light and a dashboard message regarding FAP fluid low level came on.

I still did 3 full diesel tanks after the first warning.

2 questions:

1 How many fuel tanks can we do after the warning comes on, until we are actually running the motor without aditive?

2 A 2011 berlingo takes how many liters of the additive? It is a dv6c motor... and in the software when acessing the bsi, it says it is only a 1L tank...

Cheers.
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#2
(30-07-2016, 07:01 AM)Luis Rosa Wrote:  Hello all.

During my trip back from holidays, a triangle warning light and a dashboard message regarding FAP fluid low level came on.

I still did 3 full diesel tanks after the first warning.

2 questions:

1 How many fuel tanks can we do after the warning comes on, until we are actually running the motor without aditive?

2 A 2011 berlingo takes how many liters of the additive? It is a dv6c motor... and in the software when acessing the bsi, it says it is only a 1L tank...

Cheers.

So from what I found in other forums, the warning comes up when there in enough additive left for 480L of diesel (circa 8 60L tanks);


edit: it seems these later models do not have a solid tank for the additive, but take a plastic pouch (like a blood bag) inside the plastic external casing.
Since I have already ordered a 3L kit, maybe I will regret  not have waited to disassemble it before ordering - I think re-filing the plastic bag will be an adventure.
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#3
I have already reset the onboard computer regarding the fluid level, and the information I have from the software is that the tank in my car has the capacity for 1020mL of additive when full. The low level warning came up when 180mL of additive were left in the tank. According to the DIAGBOX messages, this would only be enough for doing around 2000km (that I have done already, and some more), but in reality, in the additive notes (powerflex) It only needs 8 mL per 50L of diesel, which means there would be enough still for more than 13000km when the alarm came up...maybe this is about the way the additive sits inside the tank, as it is one of these blood-bag like deposits, that when coming low on 180 mL, the feeding of the additive to the diesel tank is not guaranteed anymore...

Anyway, tomorrow for the topping up.

this video I found is the one showing showing the procedure where the additive tank is the most similar to the one I have in my Pug:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwTN9qZVLYE

I have also bought another brand of additive (Eolys Powerflex from Walker), not the one on the video.
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#4
I have filled a bag, it's very messy & time consuming.
Most of the time we replace the bags due to them puncturing, so look out for small stones in the holder as this is for sure the cause of puncture.
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#5
The computer works low level out by calculating what's been injected rather than a float, so don't ignore it, it'll cost you way more than a bag of highly carcinogenic fluid that's not nice stuff at all! Is it really worth saving less than a fiver to risk your dpf and vans ability to be used on the road? When you think of squeezing extra life from a system that's can be life and death to your van effectively???
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#6
(05-08-2016, 09:05 PM)Lighty Wrote:  I have filled a bag, it's very messy & time consuming.
Most of the time we replace the bags due to them puncturing, so look out for small stones in the holder as this is for sure the cause of puncture.

In the end there was no bag in sight. Just a tank. Wherever the liquid stays, I could not see it, because the black tank, like the one in the video (exactly like the one in the video) was closed and could not be opened. The tank took far more than 1L (I putted more than 1.5L in, and could have put more I guess).

but the label in the tank said its capacity was 1,07 L, and confirmed to me the additive to use was EOLYS powerflex.

Next time the message pops up I know I have enough left for more than 2 diesel tanks...(as the counter still accounts for 1L only)...

The job itself was not very easy, as I don't own a car lift. But I parked the car with the back wheels on the sidewalk, and the height difference was enough for me to work.

I had to remove a plastic protection (3x 8mm screws, very rusty) and 2 plastic screw-type plugs that held a thermal protection to the tank. The tank itself was held in place only by one 13mm screw (also rusty, some WD40 did the trick), and two plastic connections had to be forced to get undone. The tank came down, and then I disconnected the outlet tube and electric plug. Then just followed the procedure as in the video.

Carefull, the liquid is very caustic (a very basic solution of iron and some organic solvents), and I have used some gloves, but even so I got a bit here and there in my arms and hands, that I washed promptly.

By the way: I noticed there was a small radiator down there, with connections that looked like were going to the fuel tank. Anyone knows whai it is for?

Cheers.
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#7
(06-08-2016, 07:49 AM)dumdum Wrote:  The computer works low level out by calculating what's been injected rather than a float, so don't ignore it, it'll cost you way more than a bag of highly carcinogenic fluid that's not nice stuff at all! Is it really worth saving less than a fiver to risk your dpf and vans ability to be used on the road? When you think of squeezing extra life from a system that's can be life and death to your van effectively???

I did not ignore it, but the warning came up during a 2-day trip between Portugal and Germany, where I still had more than 1500km to do. Since the warning said "low level", and the motor did not get in limp mode, I figured there should be a reserve level enough for 2 or 3 diesel tanks at least...

It is topped up already with 1.5L, and the counter reset. Next job is to decide wheather I will buy a new or a recycled DPF, and what material will I buy, Cordierite or Silicon Carbide...

Any hints on this choice from you all? The car is now 145000 kms, the diagbox says the dpf will only last further 17000 km (again a km-based counter). The major part of the year I use the car daily for very short trips to work. Then, once or twice a year, It gets to do 7500kms in 30 days, where 5000 are made in just 4...

What does your experience say?: new?, recycled?, Cordierite?, Silicon Carbide?

Thanks!
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#8
Have you tried a forced regeneration via diagbox/lexia? This will clean the dpf and extend its life greatly by doing what it's not doing automatically with short trips, also check the dpf pressure sensor reading, as long as it's below 100mb at 3krpm your good to go (check it before and after regeneration to make sure it's done its job) it is possible to do more than one forced regenerations to help a loaded particulate filter too... I'd try this before spending on a cat as its free Wink
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#9
(06-08-2016, 08:48 AM)dumdum Wrote:  Have you tried a forced regeneration via diagbox/lexia? This will clean the dpf and extend its life greatly by doing what it's not doing automatically with short trips, also check the dpf pressure sensor reading, as long as it's below 100mb at 3krpm your good to go (check it before and after regeneration to make sure it's done its job) it is possible to do more than one forced regenerations to help a loaded particulate filter too... I'd try this before spending on a cat as its free Wink

Thanks for your tip.

Where did you find/learn the 100mbar @3k rpm number? I am curious, and knowing these values is important...

I checked mine and it is running at 20mbar @3k rpm, but i just came back from a 2750km trip...

As I said before, the 17000km "deadline" that was displayed in diagbox is just a counter that goes down with the km stand. This one we can always reset. Of course I will only replace the dpf when at least 2 or 3 forced regeneration cycles cannot solve the problem... in the end I dont do only and just city driving the rest of the year, as every now and then I have to make 400km trips to Berlin...and I am in Germany - the autobahn does not have a speed limit Smile, all good things for keeping the dpf clean as a whistle. But I know this becomes more of a problem when getting to the 180000 km stand, as the filter material starts to crack and crumble...

Cheers.
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