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Speed limits
#1
The same as a car ?

IE 70 on motorways and dual carriageway (UOS),

60 on single carriageways (UOS),

30 where there are street lights (UOS).
'98 D 800 van Big Grin
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#2
sorry not quite sure what you mean Colin, regards Jamie
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#3
Think he is asking if a berlingo/multispace can travel at national limits?

If so, then yes.
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#4
I did think that but what is UOS
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#5
UOS = unless otherwise stated eg a standing 20, 40 or 50 sign on a post.

Its just that 'er indoors heard about some one getting pulled in a van for speeding, whereas at that speed in a car they'd have been OK. I had a feeling that was years ago. Hence the question.

Clearly mine is a VAN - no question - but the 4/5 seat passenger Berlingo's I would call "cars" so I was after clarification.

Mind you, I'm not sure if mine will go over 60 anyway.



Just found this :-

Clarification of national speed limits for vans from the Dept of Transport

It is very important for drivers to bear in mind that vans (and all goods vehicles not exceeding 7.5 tonnes) are subject to lower national speed limits than cars on both single and dual carriageway roads.

Whilst a car may travel at up to 60 mph on single carriageways and 70 mph on dual carriageways vans are only allowed to travel up to 50 mph on single carriageway roads and 60 mph on dual carriageway roads.

[Remember that the speed limits quoted here are national limits, a lower speed limit will apply in built up areas and on many local roads. Where a lower speed limit is signed you must comply with those lower limits].

Q. Where do these different speed limits for vans come from?
A. The national speed limits are set out in Schedule 6 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act of 1984 and they are summarised in regulation 124 of the Sept 2007 version of the Highway Code.

Q. Why should vans have lower speed limits than cars when they now have modern advanced braking systems like cars?
A. The main reason for these lower speed limits is that goods vehicles are designed to be able to carry heavier loads and when laden they will tend to take longer to slow down than a car traveling at the same speed.

Q. Why are the speed limits different when very often cars & vans are in the same tax class for DVLA registration purposes?
A. Some people make the mistake of thinking that if a van is in the same tax or registration class as a car then it is subject to the same speed limits. However the two issues are unrelated and they are governed by different legislation. National speed limits are set out in the 1984 legislation are based on the possible load capacities of the vehicle and whether or not it is used for carrying passengers.

Q. Are there any exemptions from these lower speed limits for vans?
A. There is one (small) group of vans which have the same speed limits are cars by virtue of the definitions in Schedule 6 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act of 1984. These are vans that are both derived from a car chassis and also have a maximum laden weight of no more than 2 tonnes. This means that the weight of the vehicle and the payload it is designed to be able to carry when added together do not exceed 2 tonnes. The van design must be a derivative of a car body, it is not sufficient that it looks similar to a particular car.

Q. Which vans meet the criteria to be considered car derived vans for speed limit purposes?
A. Very few vans will meet the criteria to benefit from the same speed limits as a car. Those that do are likely to be similar to a Ford Fiesta van ,Vauxhall Corsa or Renault Clio van in having maximum payloads of around 500kgs so that when combined with the weight of the vehicle unladen (normally around 1.4 tonnes) the maximum laden weight of the whole vehicle will not exceed 2 tonnes.

What this means is that vans such as the Ford Transit and (and of course the larger panel vans) will not meet the definition of car derived vans set out set out in part IV section 2 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984. Therefore these vehicles will be subject to speed limits of 50mph on single carriageways and 60 mph on dual carriageways.

Q. When did these rules come in and shouldn't they be changed now?
A. These speed limit rules have been in place for well over 20 years and there are no plans to change these limits to allow vans to be driven at higher speeds because ministers remain to be convinced that it would be safe to do so.

Q. Do these speed limits apply if the van is traveling without a load?
A. The national speed limits apply to the vehicle type and it makes no difference whether the vehicle at a particular time is fully loaded, partially loaded or traveling without a load.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

SO THE QUESTION IS - IS A BERLINGO VAN "derived from a car chassis and also have a maximum laden weight of no more than 2 tonnes. The van design must be a derivative of a car body ..." ? I would say yes, but would welcome clarification from those in the know.
'98 D 800 van Big Grin
[+] 1 user says Thank You to colinh for this post
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#6
I think that er indoors is correct in that some lorries are not allowed to go above a certain speed but I could be wrong
Well as they say you learn something new every day
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#7
(24-01-2011, 10:20 PM)jimbo Wrote:  I think that er indoors is correct in that some lorries are not allowed to go above a certain speed but I could be wrong
Well as they say you learn something new every day
Heavy goods or LGVs as they are known now are supposedly fitted with RSLs or Road Speed Limiters which in theory should cut-in and limit the top speed to 56mph, they are sealed units and should be tamper proof but it is not unknown for seals to be broken and speed limiters tampered with.

I ask, how many times have you or I been overtaken by a waggon blasting down the motorway???

Berlingo Multispace 2.0HDI '54 reg Mediterranean Blue
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#8
Its when you get two and one is trying to pass the other because it can go 2mph faster that tickles me
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#9
Plus Andy...they are usually lorries from N.I. Aggressive Eamons and Patricks behind the wheel.
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#10
Doesnt make me laugh it pisses me off, one tries to pass another with as you say 2 miles per hour differance and makes a line of traffic build up behind whilst we all wait...and for what , on the next down hill bit the slower lorry will often re overtake.
Sadly lorry drivers in my experience are NOT always the knights of the road, but then neither are reps, or old people or teenagers.....need I go on ....
[+] 1 user says Thank You to pch for this post
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