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Removing battery for recharging
#1
Can any members advise how to go about removing the battery for recharging and are there any special precautions I need to be aware of?
The car is a 55reg 2.0 HDI Berlingo.
Thanks
Neil
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#2
Hi Neil
follow the procedure in the second part and you won't go far wrong. The reset of the BSI is excellent as well. Don't worry that the caption says Peugot as they are the same machine.


Tutchi
Cool

http://www.bba-reman.com/content.aspx?co...ot_process
P.S. Welcome to the Forum.
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#3
I'm not familiar with your particular Berlingo but you may with to confirm that you hve the PIN code for the stereo before you start!!!!

Presuming it's a negative earth vehicle (most are now) Remove the negative terminal first, then the positive taking care not to short the spanner to the chasis. People quite often tape the spanner to isolate it appart from the jaws at the end to prevent shorting. I've seen the result of exploding batteries where the spanner has shorted out and it's not funny.

If it's not a maintenance free battery you may need top it up with distilled water before charging-in this case leave the plugs out when charging. If you are going to charge it, do it outside - hydrogen gas is produced during charging.


Try this link http://www.batterystuff.com/tutorial_battery.html

HTH Steve

I presume you can post links???
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#4
(28-12-2011, 09:58 AM)neil665 Wrote:  Can any members advise how to go about removing the battery for recharging and are there any special precautions I need to be aware of?
The car is a 55reg 2.0 HDI Berlingo.
Thanks in advance.
Neil

Hi Neil.
Why would you want to remove the battery to charge it?
It is perfectly safe to recharge in situ.
Unless you cant get your vehicle close enough to a 230v outlet?
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#5
(28-12-2011, 12:39 PM)j90xxx Wrote:  
(28-12-2011, 09:58 AM)neil665 Wrote:  Can any members advise how to go about removing the battery for recharging and are there any special precautions I need to be aware of?
The car is a 55reg 2.0 HDI Berlingo.
Thanks in advance.
Neil

Hi Neil.
Why would you want to remove the battery to charge it?
It is perfectly safe to recharge in situ.
Unless you cant get your vehicle close enough to a 230v outlet?

Martin
handbook says disconnect before charging???
Tutchi
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#6
I remember a post here from pk7478 giving advice about disconnecting the battery when jump starting another car to avoid burning out a diode bridge in the alternator. Don't know if that might be applicable here. FWIW
2010 Berlingo Multispace HDi 110 with FAP. Persamos green.

[Image: ab197646.gif]
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#7
I have never disconnected my battery for charging.It may be necessary to boost charge.My charger is a bog standard 6amp jobby,& is used once a month in winter due to less usage(I hibernate).
Mine is a 1.6 HDi '07,had it from new & guess it has been charged about 30 times.
Strawberry flavoured windows  Dodgy
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#8
jumped mine a few times after leaving things on overnight.never disconnected it and no probs !

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#9
When I changed batteries recently I made sure I had the radio code.

Then I took the old battery out and fitted the new one.

OK so far.

But on opening the car door the alarm went off. It took me a minute the find the keys, blip the button twice to lock & unlock the car and then all was well.

'98 D 800 van Big Grin
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#10
Ok.
A diode bridge or bridge rectifier is protection against reverse polarity on a battery charger, for example. (A diode only lets current flow in one direction.)
This, like most sensitive electronics fitted to modern vehicles, could possibly be damaged by a high current surge, but not by voltage as you are never supplying more than 12v (or 13-14v from a charger) in to the battery.
In years gone by cars used a DC generator to charge the battery, but their output was dependant on rpm. At tickover less output current was produced.
(Remember dynamo lights on bicycles; the faster you pedalled, the brighter the lights.)
Modern alternators use voltage regulators to supply a constant voltage and more recent vehicles now use the ECU instead.
A diode bridge on an alternator converts the AC current to DC and they are about 70amps on a modern car.
As most battery chargers provide a quarter of that current, I cannot see how charging a battery when connected should cause a problem.
If you want to be on the safe side, disconnect one lead when charging. Doesn't matter which one, as you are 'breaking' the circuit.
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