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Supermarket Diesel
#1
Recently I was advised by someone who is an engine fanatic (his words) that supermarket diesel contains biodiesel in order to keep the price down and that the new generations of cars can suffer if it is used. (Specifically in my case for my brother's VW Golf.) I know that pure biofuel can attack the seals pump and injectors in the system of some cars but didnt know about the supermarket mixes issue. Anyone here got any opinions on this? Is the Berlingo ok for to use it? Mine is a 2004 1.9. How can you tell if the fuel at the pumps is a mix?
I have done a search and cant find a related thread to put this question in so am starting a new thread. It would seem to be an important issue.
Duh Confusedillyme: when I posted this the 'related threads' showed one up. Sorry but I will leave it here rather than rewrite.
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#2
Not sure about the UK but diesel bought at filling stations in France contains I think 5% biodiesel.

If you talk to the tanker drivers they will tell you that they fill the Shell, BP etc and supermarket tankers at the same filling point at the refinery, the Shell etc drivers pull to one side and put their own additives in, so the fuel is all the same. If supermarket diesel contains bio then so must the main brands.

Peter
[+] 1 user says Thank You to Romahomepete for this post
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#3
It is my belief that some supermarkets purchase their fuels from the same sources that also supply fuels to many of the "Big Name" fuel retailers in the UK.
I've not heard of the supermarkets adding biofuels to "water down" their stock, but to be honest there is so much heresay & conjecture surrounding the many issues of supermarket fuel vs Shell/Esso/BP etc that I don't know what to believeConfusedcratch:
I find it hard to believe though that the supermarkets would knowingly add something to their fuel which may cause harm to modern engines, surely if this was ever proved to be the case they would more than likely have a deluge of court cases against them for compensation? Not exactly what they would want.

I do know that I have never found any discernible difference between supermarket fuel and other brands of fuel in any of my cars over the years, generally I will go for whichever fuel is the cheaper.
I'm not debunking the theory that biofuels may cause damage of some sort to modern fuel systems in the long term, more that the supermarkets would knowingly introduce additives to their fuels which could cause serious engine damage.

Ps: this is all in my own opinion as a "Car Fanatic" Wink although I am an engineer this is not my field of expertise.
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#4
Having worked in the "fuel" industry some time ago I can confirm that all tankers fill up at the same place regardless of the company name on the side. The only way to get the fuel cheap is by the bulk method which is why supermarket fuel is usually cheaper, but some use it as a loss leader, you could of course buy it by the tanker and then lay off the coast until the price goes up, like they do in Milford Haven but you would really have to raid the piggy bank.
[+] 1 user says Thank You to talos for this post
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#5
I've never had any problems with supermarket diesel in my Berlingo, and I used to drive a 2.5D transit as a courier, it had 60k on the clock when I bought it and when I finally got rid of it it had nearly 300k, most of this mileage was done on supermarket diesel and the engine never let me down once, the only time the engine got touched with a spanner was at service time. Now the body work, well that's a different matter..
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#6
Biodiesel statement
This information is correct at time of publication/review 3rd March 2010
Standard Forecourt Fuel – BS EN 590
Volkswagen Group does approve the use of diesel fuel containing up to 7% Biodiesel in all of their diesel vehicles. The
change to legislation on 1st April 2010, insists that fuel suppliers must use at least 3.5% Biofuel in diesel production. In
accordance with European legislation (Directive 2003/30/EC) the Biofuel content in forecourt fuel will gradually increase
over the next few years, to meet the objective to reduce the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions produced by road
transport.
Filling station forecourts supply diesel (to the standard BS EN590), which can now contain up to 7% Biodiesel with at
least 93% Fossil fuel. The use of this fuel requires no modifications to the vehicle or changes to the vehicles’
maintenance schedule.
Important: BS EN 590 is approved for vehicles fitted with a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF).
B30 Biodiesel
Volkswagen Group does not approve the use of B30 Biodiesel in any of its vehicles. B30 Biodiesel is a blend of 70%
Fossil fuel and 30% Biofuel, derived from Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME). The use of this fuel in Volkswagen Group
vehicles may invalidate the engine and exhaust system warranty.
100% Biodiesel
Certain Volkswagen Group vehicle models are approved to run on 100% Rapeseed Methyl Ester (RME) Biodiesel. 100%
RME Biodiesel compatible parts fitted during manufacture of the vehicle is denoted by the vehicle PR code 2G0, which is
found on the data sticker; however some of the older vehicles may not have this PR code. Always refer to the Owner’s
Handbook and factory information regarding the vehicle’s compliance with Biodiesel before using this fuel type. In
vehicles that are 100% Biodiesel compatible, Volkswagen Group has only approved the use of Rapeseed Methyl Ester
(RME) to standard DIN EN 14214. No other Biodiesel can be used.
Important:
• Vehicles that do not have the factory preparation for Biodiesel cannot use 100% Biodiesel.
• Vehicles fitted with a Common Rail fuel injection system cannot use 100% Biodiesel.
• Vehicles fitted with Pumpe-Duse injectors cannot use 100% Biodiesel.
• Vehicles fitted with a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) cannot use 100% Biodiesel, however EN590 containing up
to 7% Biodiesel is approved for use with DPF.
• 100% Biodiesel vehicles cannot be used in temperatures below -10°C.
• The use of 100% Biodiesel may slightly reduce the driving performance of the vehicle and slightly increase the
fuel consumption.
• The use of 100% Biodiesel may increase the frequency of the maintenance schedule on the vehicle.
Volkswagen Vehicles:
Model Model Year B30 Biodiesel
Approval
100% RME Approval Retrofitting Possibilities
for 100% RME
Polo 2010 onwards NOT approved NOT Approved NA
Golf VI 2009 onwards NOT approved NOT Approved NA
Scirocco 2009 onwards NOT approved NOT Approved NA
Tiguan 2008 onwards NOT approved NOT Approved NA
Blue Motion
Vehicles
2007 onwards NOT approved NOT Approved NA
Eos 2006 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Touran 2003 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Passat CC 2009 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Passat 2006 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Passat 1997-2005 NOT approved From start of production NOT
approved with Pumpe-Duse
engine variants.
None
Passat 1994-1997 NOT approved From MY 1996 Limousine / Variant from
MY1994 (except TDI)
From vehicle No:
31P E 240001
31P B 240001
Retrofit kit: 3A0 298 215
Golf V 2004 - 2009 NOT approved Only with PR Code 2G0.
NOT approved with Pumpe-
Duse engine variants.
None
Golf IV 1998-2004 NOT approved From start of production NA
Polo Diesel 1995–2002,
2002 onwards
NOT approved From introduction of diesel
engines
Not planned for earlier
models
Polo
Classic
1996-2002 NOT approved From introduction of diesel
engines
NA
Golf / Vento 1992-1998 NOT approved From MY1996
All diesel engines
All Golf / Variant / Vento
since MY1992 (except TDI)
Retrofit kit: 1H0 298 215
Golf
Ecomatic
1992-1998 NOT approved From vehicle No: 1HR P491
791
For older vehicles use
retrofit kit same as Golf:
1H0 298 215
Sharan 1995-2006 NOT approved From MY 1997. NOT
approved with Pumpe-Duse
engine variants.
None
Touareg 2003 onwards NOT approved From start of production. NOT
approved with Common Rail
or Pumpe-Duse engine
variants.
NA
Phaeton 2001 onwards NOT approved From start of production. NOT
approved with Common Rail
or Pumpe-Duse engine
variants.
NA
Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles:
Model Model Year B30 Biodiesel
Approval
100% RME Approval Retrofitting Possibilities
for 100% RME
Crafter 2006 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Caddy 2004 onwards NOT approved Only with PR code 2G0.
Vehicles with PR code: 2G2 or
Auxiliary Heater or DPF are
NOT compatible.
NA
Caddy 1996-2003 NOT approved Swirl-chamber diesel and SDI
from production date week
23/1996
Not planned
T5 (EU5) 2010 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
T5 (EU4) 2003-2009 NOT approved NOT approved since week 02 /
2006. Engine codes BRR, BRS,
BNZ, BPC.
NA
T5 (EU3) 2003-2006 NOT approved From start of production for
engine codes AXB, AXC, AXD,
AXE, BLJ with PR code 2G0.
NA
T4 1996-2003 NOT approved From vehicle No.
70T H 012 212
70T X 019 998 for diesel
engines without catalysts
Up to vehicle No.
70T H 012 211
70T X 019 997 for diesel
engines without catalysts
Retrofit kit: 701 298 215
Not available for engines
with secondary heating
system
LT2 1996-2006 NOT approved From start of production Not planned
LT1 1992-1996 NOT approved NOT approved Not planned
Audi Vehicles:
Model Model Year B30 Biodiesel
Approval
100% RME Approval Retrofitting Possibilities
for 100% RME
Q5 (8R) 2009 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
A8 (4E) 2003 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Q7 (4L) 2006 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
A6 (4F) 2005 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
A5 (8T) 2008 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
A4 (8K) 2008 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
A4 (8E) 2001 onwards NOT approved From start of production until
vehicle No.
8E 5A 400 000.
The parking / auxiliary heater
should not be used, faults may
be caused if operated.
NA
A4 (8D) 1995-2002 NOT approved From vehicle No.
8D TA 043 491
NA
A4 (8H)
Cabriolet
2003 onwards NOT approved From start of production.
The parking / auxiliary heater
should not be used with RME,
NA
faults may be caused if
operated. NOT approved for
Pumpe-Duse engine variants.
Cabriolet
(8G)
1992-2000 NOT approved From vehicle No.
8G TA 003 060
NA
A3 (8P) 2003 onwards NOT approved Only with PR Code 2G0. NOT
approved for Common Rail or
Pumpe-Duse engine variants.
None
A3 (8L) 1997-2005 NOT approved From start of production. Can
cause faults with the
parking/auxiliary heater
NA
A2 (8Z) 2000-2005 NOT approved From start of production. Can
cause faults with the
parking/auxiliary heater
NA
A6 (4B) 1997-2005 NOT approved From start of production. Can
cause faults with the
parking/auxiliary heater
NA
A6 (4A)
except 2,5
quattro
1991-1997 NOT approved From vehicle No.
4A TN 018 501
Not planned
A6 (4A)
2,5 quattro
1991-1997 NOT approved From vehicle No.
4A TN 065 285
Not planned
Allroad 1997-2005 NOT approved From start of production. Can
cause faults with the
parking/auxiliary heater
NA
A8 (4D) 1994-2002 NOT approved From start of production. Can
cause faults with the
parking/auxiliary heater
NA
80/90 1987-1989 NOT approved NOT approved NA
80 1992-1996 NOT approved NOT approved NA
100 1983-1991 NOT approved NOT approved NA
100 1991-1997 NOT approved NOT approved NA
SEAT Vehicles:
Model Model Year B30 Biodiesel
Approval
100% RME Approval Retrofitting Possibilities
for 100% RME
Exeo (3R) 2009 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Ibiza (6J) 2008 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Altea XL 2006 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Toledo /
Altea EU4
2004 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Leon EU4 2006 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Alhambra
EU4
1996-2006 NOT approved NOT approved NA
Ibiza /
Cordoba EU3
(6L)
2002 onwards NOT approved From start of production. NOT
approved for Pumpe-Duse
engine variants.
NA
Toledo /
Leon EU3
1999-2004 NOT approved From start of production. NOT
approved for Pumpe-Duse
engine variants.
NA
Toledo /
Altea EU3
2004 onwards NOT approved From start of production Only
with PR code 2G0
NA
Alhambra
EU3
1996-2006 NOT approved From start of production. NOT
approved for Pumpe-Duse
engine variants.
NA
Ibiza /
Cordoba /
Vario (6K)
1996-2002 NOT approved NOT approved NA
Arosa 1997-2004 NOT approved From start of production. NOT
approved for Pumpe-Duse
engine variants.
NA
Inca 1999-2003 NOT approved From vehicle No.
TR 013605
NA
Škoda Vehicles:
Model Model Year B30 Biodiesel
Approval
100% RME Approval Retrofitting Possibilities
for 100% RME
Yeti 2010 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Superb II (3T) 2009 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Fabia II (54) 2007 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Roomster (5J) 2006 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Scout 2008 onwards NOT approved NOT approved NA
Felicia 1994-2000 NOT approved NOT approved NA
Octavia II (1Z) 2005 onwards NOT approved Only with PR Code 2G0. NOT
approved for Pumpe-Duse
engine variants.
NA
Octavia I (1U) 1997-2005 NOT approved 100% RME is approved from
start of production up to
production in week 26, 2006
(W/C 26/06/2006).
100% RME is NOT approved for
vehicles manufactured after
week 26, 2006.
Always refer to the owner’s
handbook.
NA
Fabia (6Y) 2000 - 2006 NOT approved 100% RME is approved from
start of production up to
production in week 26, 2006
(W/C 26/06/2006).
100% RME is NOT approved for
vehicles manufactured after
week 26, 2006.
Always refer to the owner’s
handbook.
NA
Superb (3U) 2002 onwards NOT approved 100% RME is approved from
start of production up to
production in week 32, 2006
(W/C 07/08/2006).
100% RME is NOT approved for
vehicles manufactured after
week 32, 2006.
Always refer to the owner’s
handbook.
NA


So, there is a small content of bio fuel in pump diesel.

All retailers do seem to get their supplies from the same place, i.e. the same fuel. Additives may or may not be added after the tanker has filled up.

Your 1.9 will have no problem using the fuel

P.S. sorry for the long post
[+] 4 users say Thank You to Coco for this post
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#7
Thanks for that info Coco, so Biofuel is added to the forecourt fuel in line with EU directives on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but is in sufficiently low amounts so as not to cause any issues with the running or servicing of the vehicle.
Good to know.
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#8
Coco is right about diesel. The bio content causes problems with algae growth causing sludge which blocks filters. Not so much of a problem with vehicles maybe but for boats etc which tend to have big tanks and little use in the Winter it is a yet another modern hassle created by the sprouts in Brussels.

Its the same with petrol. Petrol now contains at least 5% bio-ethanol by law. This causes havoc with older cars fuel systems (the rubbery bits).
'98 D 800 van Big Grin
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#9
Also problematical in some older motorcycle fuel tanks and tank liners used to cure/prevent rust
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#10
So is this an end to the argument that branded fuel (Shell, Esso, etc.) is different to supermarket fuel?
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